How to Make Tomato Paste

5 from 23 votes
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This post shows you how to make tomato paste using fresh tomatoes. Simply stock up on tomatoes while they’re in season (or if you grow your own then bonus!) and whip up batches of this tomato paste to last through Winter.

Tomato paste in a large bowl and tomatoes next to it

Up until recently, tomato paste was something I’d never even thought to try to make at home. However, that was because I didn’t know just how easy it really is to make a massive batch to last you for months. Plus homemade is always better and just so super delicious in comparison to its store-bought counterparts. Especially considering you can choose exactly which tomatoes you’d like to add to the paste for different flavor profiles. 

fresh red tomatoes for making homemade tomato puree/ paste

Tomato paste is one of my most-used kitchen preserves. I use it to add flavor to bland dishes, soups, stocks, sauces, homemade pizzas, pasta dishes, etc. 

You might be put off by the fact that making this homemade tomato paste, it’s an hours-long process. However, in reality, the actual amount of time you have to actively do anything is about 15 minutes. The rest of the time is simply leaving the tomatoes to reduce.

fresh red tomatoes for making homemade tomato puree/ paste

How to Store Your Homemade Tomato Paste

Within this recipe, I’ve shown you a way to keep it jarred and fresh by covering the top of the paste in olive oil to ward off any mold. This way they can be kept in the fridge for 3-4 months.

However, it’s worth noting you can also dole this paste out into smaller portions, such as with an ice-cube tray, and freeze. These can then be kept for around 8 months (I’ve always run out before then so it’s hard to give you an exact time frame).

Because I tend to freeze the majority of my batches and then keep a single jar out to use per month, I’ve not done a lot of experimentation in terms of other preservation methods. However, if you have any suggestions then please let me know in the comments below and I’ll give them a try!

Tomato puree in a jar and tomatoes next to it

How to make your homemade tomato paste

As I previously mentioned, the process of making tomato paste is long but fairly low-effort and super simple. 

First of all, select the tomatoes that you want to use. Depending on which you choose can affect the yield of paste you have at the end so experimentation can be key to finding your perfect flavor/yield balance. 

fresh red tomatoes for making homemade tomato puree/ paste

Next, you juice the tomatoes. 

fresh red tomato juice for making homemade tomato puree/ paste

Then run the mixture through a sieve to get rid of any remaining lumpy bits (for a truly smooth paste).

Sieving tomato juice into a pot

You then simply place the tomato juice into a pan on low heat and leave, leave, leave to reduce! Stirring every twenty minutes or so.

Remove from the five when you are happy with the consistency. 

 reducing fresh red tomato juice for making homemade tomato puree/ paste

homemade tomato puree/paste made using fresh red tomatoes that can be preserved for months

Keep in an airtight jar. 

homemade tomato puree/paste made using fresh red tomatoes that can be preserved for months

If you give this handy how-to for homemade tomato paste, let me know what you think in the comments below. And, as always, I’d love to see your creations so feel free to tag me @Alphafoodie

Tomato Paste

5 from 23 votes
By: Samira
This post shows you how to make tomato paste using fresh tomatoes. Simply stock up on tomatoes while they're in season (or if you grow your own then bonus!) and whip up batches of this tomato puree to last through Winter.
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 3 hours
Total Time: 3 hours 10 minutes
Servings: 24 Tbsp

Equipment

  • Pot

Ingredients 
 

  • 9 pounds red ripe tomatoes
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil

Instructions 

  • Wash the tomatoes and get rid of the green stems. Then juice the tomatoes (this would yield about 3.5 Litres) *
    Two pitchers with tomato juice and a jar with tomato juice
  • Sieve the tomato juice into a large saucepan, to get rid of any remaining lumpy bits
    Sieving tomato juice into a pot
  • Over a low and steady heat begin to reduce the tomato juice mix, stirring every about 20 minutes until you reduce all the water (this process will take several hours) but you can leave them and do other things.  
    When the paste is thick you can switch off the heat, add the salt and leave it to cool down completely.
    Tomato paste in a spoon
  • Place them in a airtight glass jar and top it with the olive oil (thick layer) to make sure it covers the surface to protect the paste (this will seal it and prevent the formation of any mould). 
    Place in the fridge for 3-4 months **
    A small jar full with tomato paste

Video

Notes

* You are also able to use a blender for the tomatoes, however, this requires a couple of extra steps and it's easier to then boil the tomatoes in water first (or roughly chop and simply fry in a pan to release juices) for 10 minutes to soften before blending. Many also prefer to remove the tomato seeds when making the puree this way as the seeds can make the puree more bitter. 
** Alternatively spoon into an ice-cube tray and freeze in individual portions. These can then be kept in the freezer for 8-9 months. 
 
9 pounds of tomatoes yielded about 1.5 cups of tomato paste for me. 
Course: DIYs
Cuisine: European
Freezer friendly: 8 Months
Shelf life: 4 Months

Nutrition

Serving: 1Tbsp, Calories: 70kcal, Carbohydrates: 7g, Protein: 1g, Fat: 5g, Saturated Fat: 1g, Sodium: 105mg, Potassium: 403mg, Fiber: 2g, Sugar: 4g, Vitamin A: 1417IU, Vitamin C: 23mg, Calcium: 17mg, Iron: 1mg

Nutrition information is automatically calculated, so should only be used as an approximation.

 

 

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17 Comments

  1. Jennifer says:

    Hi ! I just wanted to add that I remove the seeds before mixing the tomatoes. I collect the seeds and press out as much of the juice/jelly around the seeds and add the juice to the juiced tomatoes before cooking. The result is a sweeter, less bitter tomato paste ! And more digestible since less leptin.

    1. Support @ Alphafoodie says:

      Thank you so much for your comment, Jennifer. This is a great tip!

  2. Rima says:

    Thanks for this, I always thought it was difficult to make tomato paste, but you made it look easy! Will definitely try!

    1. Support @ Alphafoodie says:

      Thank you so much for your comment, Rima. I hope you gave this recipe a try 🙂

  3. Nadia says:

    5 stars
    Superb recepie! I made it. The taste and colour is heavenly. Thank you alphafoodie for the recepie.

    1. Support @ Alphafoodie says:

      Thank you so much for your comment, Nadia. So happy you made and liked the recipe. 🙂

  4. Veggies_babies says:

    5 stars
    Thank you Samira. This DIY are the best

  5. Martin says:

    People who consider canning tomatoes or the paste should read up on proper hygiene to avoid botulism which is a real concern. But I’m guessing that people who have huge amounts of tomatoes are probably well informed.

    1. Support @ Alphafoodie says:

      Thank you for your comment, Martin. That’s a great point 🙂

  6. Naj says:

    so how much gram (net weight) of the paste after making 4 kilos of tomatoes into a paste?

    1. AlphaFoodie says:

      Hi Naj, I would say between 500 to 600 grams depending how juicy the tomatoes are.
      Hope that helps
      Best wishes,
      Samira

  7. Vaishali Chaudhary says:

    In this tomato soup/paste olive oil option is there?

    1. Support @ Alphafoodie says:

      Hi Vaishali,
      The olive oil is used to preserve the tomato paste for longer. By covering the top of the paste with olive oil, it wards off any mold. I hope this helps.

  8. Banaz says:

    how long l can keep it? or for how long l can use ut?

    1. AlphaFoodie says:

      it should last 3-4 months in the fridge or 8-9months in the freezer

      1. elsee says:

        Thanks for the information on storage

      2. Support @ Alphafoodie says:

        Hi Elsee,
        I hope it helped 🙂