DIY Turmeric Tincture – Nature’s Golden Medicine

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A healthy, budget-friendly turmeric black pepper tincture to boost your immune system. Plus a guide on how to make a tincture and the various health benefits of this turmeric tincture!

A big jar with homemade turmeric tincture with three small dropper bottles around dit and some turmeric laying on a flat surface

I’m already obsessed with the health benefits of turmeric and now here is a healthy, budget-friendly turmeric black pepper tincture. Within this blog post, I’ll show you how to make a tincture and explain how to use it and what the benefits are.

You probably already know that I am obsessed with turmeric, and it’s multiple health benefits. Not only is it an excellent anti-inflammatory, but it also aids digestion and helps in staving off a cold. And that’s to name a few of its many benefits.

turmeric tincture and turmeric roots

In fact, if you haven’t already seen them, then you can check out my recipes for some daily turmeric energy shots the blender version and the juicer version where I include the full list of health benefits of turmeric.

But just in case you’re not entirely convinced, here is some more information. Turmeric root is a fantastic ingredient that can increase the antioxidant capacity of the body and protects the body from free radicals. There are studies to show that turmeric may even slow down the ageing process.

And why is turmeric such an excellent ingredient? Well, have you heard of curcumin?

close up of grated turmeric

Curcumin is the active ingredient of turmeric root and is known for various fantastic health benefits. This includes being beneficial for heart health, regulating blood pressure and reducing the risk of clotting.

There are even studies that show that curcumin could help prevent the growth (and development) of cancerous cells. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory properties do a wonder of good for our bodies in staving off a large number of diseases and issues.

So basically, what I’m saying is that this is an actual wonder ingredient. So, If there is a way to use this great nature’s treasure in yet another healthy way, please sign me up! – Oh hello, turmeric tincture, I see you.

This is probably the point that you may be wondering what precisely a turmeric tincture is, how to make a tincture, and how to use one.

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What is turmeric tincture?

turmeric tincture in dropper bottle

A tincture isn’t exactly a word that is casually thrown around in most households, so I don’t blame you if you’re a little confused as to what I’m talking about.

Alcohol-based tinctures are a concentrated liquid form or extract of a plant/fresh herbs that have been dissolved in alcohol. For an alcohol-free version, you can use glycerine. Most recently you may have seen (or heard) a lot of hype about the CBD oil tinctures that are currently making the rounds on social media as the ‘it’ new health product.

When specifically focusing on a turmeric tincture – this liquid form of curcumin allows for much faster and better absorption of the chemical by the body.

As the body doesn’t need to break down a liquid extract, the medicinal properties are easily absorbed into the system.

How to use this turmeric tincture?

turmeric tincture in jar and a spoon

Turmeric tincture is very easy to use. You just need a 1 ml tincture dissolved in a glass of water 2-3 times a day. So basically, not only are you receiving amazing health benefits from the turmeric, but you’re also encouraged to drink more water. Win-win situation!

Alternatively, if you’re struggling with the taste, then you can mix the drops into some fruit juice.

I know that people have tried to use this in a similar way to CBD oil by using the dropper under the tongue. However, the flavour of this turmeric black pepper tincture is powerful and can give you the ‘burning throat’ sensation – so I don’t recommend taking it this way.

turmeric tincture, dropper bottle, turmeric root and strainer

I think it’s important to note though that before using any tincture or herbal medicine, you should consult your doctor, especially if taking any medication. Turmeric is healthy to be ingested every day of the year; however, certain chemicals and nutrients can reduce the absorption of certain medications.

Note* dropper bottles contain about 20 drops per dropper full, which is about 1 ml. 

How to make a tincture?

As a general rule of thumb, herbal tinctures need a very high level of alcohol based solvent like vodka to be made. In many commercial tinctures,  60-70% alcohol is usually used. The alcohol then extracts the various active ingredients from your fresh or dried herbs/plant. It also stabilises the final tincture.

As we aren’t making this commercially, I’m not going to suggest trying to get your hands on alcohol solvent at that level. Instead, I recommend using high quality organic (if possible),  strong alcohol. For example, a 70% ,or 90 proof Vodka would work well.

ingredients to make a turmeric tincture

It’s best to use fresh organic turmeric roots. However, it is also possible to use turmeric powder.
Why use organic roots, you may wonder. First, there are no nasties from any pesticides and no processing into making it a powder. But also, you can keep the skin on organic turmeric root as it brings extra nutrients.

You also need organic black pepper. The ratio of pepper to turmeric is 1:10 (in grams).

You will need equal amounts of cold alkaline water and high-quality.
Note: the alcohol can be replaced with glycerine for a non-alcoholic version of the tincture.

The proportions of herb to liquid should be about 1 part herb to 4 parts liquid (1:4) or 1 part herb to 5 parts liquid (1:5). So for example to make a 1:4 tincture you would need 250 grams of turmeric, to 500ml of vodka and 500ml water, and a 1:5 tincture would be 200g herb to 500ml of vodka and 500ml water.

I sometimes also add Acerola Cherry – this, however, is optional. Acerola Cherry is rich in Vitamin C  and antioxidants and acts as a preservative, thus making it a great addition.

Before you start, make sure to sterilise all your tools and containers – any spoon, jar, blender jug that would come in contact with the turmeric tincture must be well washed and sterilised. This is the first and most crucial step for making the tincture.

An easy way to sterilise your tools is to wash them with boiling water – boil some water in the kettle and pour it over the tools.

Start by grating the turmeric. Make sure to wear gloves to prevent your hands from staining in yellow. You can also blend it in a food processor/blender just long enough to break it down into tiny bits.

turmeric in a food processor

Alternatively, you can also finely slice your turmeric. However, I’ve found that grated turmeric works better for me. This is because when it comes time to drain the liquid into the dropper bottles, grated turmeric will allow more liquid to be squeezed out.

blended fresh turmeric in a food processor

This is not only more cost-efficient but also better for the quality of tincture.

It’s also important to note that each solvent extracts various properties from your herb/plant. I’ve suggested using a mixture of alcohol and water or glycerine and water here. You can also make a version with all three ingredients to try and extract everything possible. However, I want to keep things as simple as possible here.

the ingredients to make a homemade turmeric tincture

Also, if you are worried about the alcohol in the tincture – I remember reading that if you put your turmeric dropper into hot water, the alcohol will simply evaporate. I don’t know enough about this to be an expert, however, it’s still worth trying. Alternatively you can make an alcohol-free version of this using organic vegetable glycerin but this will take longer (almost double the time to extract).

The next step is to add the grated turmeric into a sterilised glass container. Add the black pepper and acerola cherry powder (this is optional for added vitamin C). Pour the alcohol over, then add the water.

the process of making a homemade turmeric tincture. healthy turmeric natural medicine

Stir well and put away in a dark cupboard. It’s important to keep the mixture away from sunlight – tucked away in a cupboard or even better, stored in darkened glass jars container in a cupboard.

Every couple of days, opens and stir well. Then return to its ‘hiding spot.’

stirring turmeric tincture

To extract the curcumin and get the tincture, the turmeric needs to soak for at least six weeks in its glass container (the alcohol free glycerin version  takes even a bit longer – almost double the amount of time).

turmeric tincture and turmeric root

In 6-weeks time, this mixture can be drained and stored in little darkened dropper bottles.

To transfer the tincture, just pass the mixture from the jar thought a sieve or a tea strainer into a clear container.

sieving turmeric tincture

Make sure to press well so that all the liquid is extracted.

Then fill up darkened dropper bottles. They are most convenient but you could use other darkened bottles and then carefully pour the tincture when needed.

pouring turmeric tincture in a darkened bottle

Then the turmeric elixir is ready to be used.

turmeric tincture in a dropper bottle

Since the tincture is alcohol base, the shelf-life is very stable. It can be used up to a year after making it.

If you try this recipe then let me know your thoughts in the comments. Also, I love seeing your recreations so feel free to tag me on Instagram @AlphaFoodie.

Turmeric Tincture – Nature’s Golden Medicine

5 from 34 votes
By: Samira
A recipe how to make a healthy, budget-friendly turmeric black pepper tincture to boost your immune system. The blog post also offers a guide on the various health benefits of this turmeric tincture!
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 45 days 10 minutes
Servings: 750 ml

Ingredients 
 

  • 2 cups fresh turmeric ground
  • 2 cups of at least 70% alcohol based solvent like vodka
  • 2 cups alkaline water
  • 1 tBsp black pepper organic
  • 1 cup acerola cherry powder optional

Instructions 

  • Before you start, make sure to sterilize all your tools and containers – any spoon, jar, blender jug that would come in contact with the turmeric tincture must be well washed and sterilized.
  • Then grate the turmeric. Make sure to wear gloves to prevent your hands from staining in yellow.
    You can also blend it in a food processor/blender just long enough to break it down into tiny bits. *
  • Add the grated turmeric into a sterilized glass container. Add the black pepper and acerola cherry powder. **
  • Pour the alcohol over, then add the water.
  • Stir well and put away in a dark cupboard for 6 weeks. 
  • Every couple of days, open the jar and stir with clean spoon. Put back in the cupboard.
  • In 6-weeks time, this mixture can be drained and stored in little darkened dropper bottles. Then it’s ready to be used. 
  • Dissolve 0.5 ml (about 10 drops) tincture in a glass of water and take 1-2 times a day.

Video

Notes

*Keep on mind that the turmeric might stain the jar of the blender.
* For an alcohol-free turmeric tincture, replace the vodka with food grade vegetable glycerin.
* Acerola Cherry is rich in Vitamin C  and antioxidants and acts as a preservative, thus making it a great addition.
Course: DIYs
Cuisine: Health Supplements
Freezer friendly: No
Shelf life: 1 Year

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50 Comments

  1. Can I Just juice the turmeric then use the pulp from that to make the tincture or would I have to add the pulp and juice together to make the tincture?

    1. Hi Donna,
      You can scale down the recipe. In any case, even if you were to make a big batch, it has a long shelf-life to take a big every day.

  2. So excited to try my tincture now that I’ve bottled it. Just wondering if it was meant to separate due to the cherry powder and will need shaking each time OR have I done something wrong?

  3. 5 stars
    Easy & understandable instructions were great. My tincture is 3 weeks in. Cant wait to use it. I’m beginning to start others now…ginger is next. Thanks for the info, greatly appreciated!

      1. Hi Cyndie ,
        The acerola cherry powder is needed for its high content of vitamin C – it acts as a natural preservative. You can omit it but don’t substitute it with beet powder.

  4. Thanks for this recipe! If I use turmeric powder (I understand 1tsp. = 1tbsp. of grated) do I still need to let it soak for 6 weeks before ingesting?

    1. Yes, you still need to let it soak for a few weeks so that the curcumin is extracted and the tincture is done.

  5. Made this today and very excited to finish it off in six weeks. I was a little confused about the alcohol and water instructions but used my Everclear 151 proof (75.5%) and 2 cups filtered water. My only real concern is that I used 1 Tablespoon ground black pepper since I saw it ground in the picture. Was I supposed to use whole peppercorns in the jar or 1Tbsp. whole peppercorns, then grind them? Did I use too much? You may want to update the ingredient list to be more clear. Hopefully mine won’t be too pepper forward. Thank you!

    1. Thank you so much for your comment and feedback, Paula.
      1 Tbsp ground black pepper is need for this recipe so you’ve used the right amount.

      1. So excited to try my tincture now that I’ve bottled it. Just wondering if it was meant to separate due to the cherry powder or have I done something wrong?

    1. Hi, normally as a general rule, each 1 tablespoon fresh grated turmeric is equivalent to 1 teaspoon ground turmeric. In this case you would want to use alcohol of slightly lower percentage than the one I recommended (for fresh). Hope this helps.

  6. Hi
    I have made the tincture and it is in the process of fermenting. I haven’t bought my dropper jars yet and was wanting to know how much does this tincture yield? How many jars should I get for it?

    1. Hi Denise,
      Sorry for the late reply. The yield is about 750ml. You can keep most of it in a large bottle or jar and only fill 1 or 2 dropper jars when needed.

  7. I am in the process of making this now and I wasn’t sure which size jar to use. (I went by how big it looked in the video – which turned out to be deceiving). I started out using a 750ml size jar but was not big enough to accommodate the water so I switched to a 2L. Which meant that I had to sterilize the 2L jar and its lid. So the tincture sat for about 20 mins. before I could pour it in to the larger jar. Will this matter? Or should it be ok?