Quick Pickled Daikon Radish

5 from 10 votes
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Pickled daikon is a popular part of many Asian dishes and is just as easy to make at home as it is to buy it at the store. Packed with goodness, this is my favorite pickled daikon recipe – and a perfect way to use up white daikon radish.

Homemade pickled daikon in a glass jar

There aren’t many veggies in this world that we can eat all of (through no fault of their own). But if you’re looking to reduce your food waste or make sure you squeeze every cent out of your produce budget, I recommend you make my pickled daikon radish recipe. And the best part – this is a quick pickle daikon recipe. So there’s no need to dedicate hours to get delicious, crunchy pickled daikon radish.

Radishes – in my opinion – are one of the most underrated veggies out there. Pickled radishes are packed full of great nutrients when they’re raw. But also, the fermentation process produces probiotics, which are fantastic for your gut health.

Pickled daikon is low-calorie and high in Vitamin C, fiber, folate, and calcium. Plus it has been shown to improve cell repair in the body, support the liver, and more.

Homemade pickled daikon in a small bowl

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What Is Daikon Radish

Part of the radish family, daikon is a winter white radish known for its abundance of leaves. Long and stout-looking, it’s classified as a cruciferous vegetable. It’s also known as a Japanese radish, where the vegetable’s origins begin, and is popularly enjoyed pickled.

Crunchy and firm, this winter radish has a similar flavor profile to the more commonly known red radish, though it provides a bit more sweetness

You can eat it raw, pickled, or cooked. All parts of daikon can be eaten, including the greens and the sprouts. You don’t even have to peel them!

Three daikon radish roots on a flat surface

Korean Radish Vs Daikon

Though similar in taste and appearance to daikon, Korean pickled radish is often shorter and rounder than its Japanese counterpart which is not dissimilarly shaped to an ordinary carrot. It can also be slightly greener at the top than a daikon radish, which will be white all the way around. 

How to Pick Good Daikon?

When picking the best vegetable for pickled white radish, you need something that will hold up during the pickling process. You want daikon that’s firm and taut to the touch and quite heavy. Also, the best daikon has white and smooth skin with evenly spaced holes that are straight down the bottom.

What Is Pickled Daikon Made of

  • Daikon radish: You’ll find fresh daikon radish in the produce section in any Japanese market, Korean market, or large Asian grocery store. If you prefer, you can also use Korean radish for this pickled daikon radish recipe – though it will be crunchier.
  • For the pickles brine: To make the pickling liquid that’ll turn white radishes into yellow pickles, I use rice vinegar (or apple cider vinegar), water, sugar, and pickling salt. You can adjust your salt-to-water ratio depending on how much pickled daikon you want to make.
  • For flavor: I’ve found the best spices to use in this recipe are peppercorns, ground turmeric, garlic, and bay leaves – though you can adjust this if you prefer.

You’ll also need a 27 oz/800ml jar with a lid.

Ingredients for pickled daikon

How to Make Pickled Daikon

There are just a few easy step-by-step instructions to follow for this pickling recipe.

Before you start, you need to sterilize your jar. Wash it well then place it in the oven to dry completely at 325ºF/160ºC (about 10-15 minutes). Remove any plastic or rubber parts from it.

Grab your daikon and clean them well. You don’t have to peel them, but I like to. Then, slice into thin rounds.

Steps for cutting daikon and preparing brine

In a saucepan, prepare the brine. Add all the liquid ingredients and spices and boil on medium heat until the sugar dissolves – about 3 to 4 minutes. Stir occasionally. 

Remove the brine from the heat and add the sliced daikon. Allow the yellow pickled radish to cool to room temperature for another 30 minutes.

Daikon and brine in a pot

Once the pickled raddish is cool, pour everything into the sterilized jar. Make sure all of the slices are covered with the vinegar mixture.

Refrigerate the pickles overnight before serving. The color of the pickled daikon will have turned a bright yellow. It will keep for up to a month when properly sealed in the refrigerator.

Before and after pickling daikon with turmeric brine

How Do You Serve Pickled Daikon

Pickled daikon is most commonly eaten on its own or as part of Japanese or Korean side dishes.

How Long Does Pickled Daikon Last

Homemade pickles that have been canned properly in sterilized jars have a shelf life of about a month. You can keep them in the fridge or, if properly sealed, at room temperature in the pantry or a cabinet. Just make sure a seal has been created to preserve the pickled daikon inside. That will extend the freshness of the radish.

Homemade pickled daikon in a small bowl

More Pickled Vegetables

Also, you might want to check these 12 popular types of radishes and what to do with radishes!

If you try this super easy daikon recipe, let me know how it goes in the comments below. I’d appreciate a recipe card rating and would love to see your recipe recreations – tag me on Instagram @Alphafoodie!

Quick Pickled Daikon Radish

5 from 10 votes
By: Samira
Pickled daikon is a popular part of many Asian dishes and is just as easy to make at home as it is to buy it at the store. Packed with goodness, this is my favorite pickled daikon recipe – and a perfect way to use up white daikon radish.
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 8 hours 10 minutes
Servings: 12

Equipment

  • Mandoline or a sharp knife
  • 1 Large jar 27 oz/800ml with a lid

Ingredients 
 

  • 1 pound daikon radish or use Korean radish
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 cup rice vinegar or white vinegar or apple cider vinegar
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1 Tbsp pickling salt
  • 1/2 Tbsp peppercorns
  • 1 tsp ground turmeric
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 2 bay leaves

Instructions 

  • To sterilize the jar, wash it well then place it in the oven to dry completely at 325ºF/160ºC (about 10-15 minutes). Remove any plastic or rubber parts from it. 
  • Grab your daikon and clean them well. You don't have to peel them, but I like to. Then, slice into thin rounds (see note below for more info).
    Slicing white radish
  • In a saucepan, prepare the brine. Add all the liquid ingredients and spices and boil on medium heat until the sugar dissolves – about 3 to 4 minutes. Stir occasionally. 
    Making brine in a pot
  • Remove the brine from the heat and add the sliced daikon. Allow them cool to room temperature for another 30 minutes.
    Pickling daikon with brine
  • Once the pickled daikon is cool, pour everything into the sterilized jar. Make sure all of the slices are covered with the brine. 
    Refrigerate the pickles overnight before serving. The color will have turned a bright yellow.
    A jar with pickled radish

Notes

You don’t have to thinly slice the daikon. You can also chop it into cubes, cut it into matchsticks, or make thin long strips with a veggie peeler.
Enjoy the yellow daikon as part of Japanese or Korean side dishes. Or to add crunch to your favorite salads and sandwiches. 
Check the blog post for more tips and serving recommendations!
Course: Side
Cuisine: Asian, Japanese
Freezer friendly: No
Shelf life: 1 Month

Nutrition

Calories: 36kcal, Carbohydrates: 8g, Protein: 0.3g, Fat: 0.1g, Saturated Fat: 0.02g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.02g, Monounsaturated Fat: 0.01g, Sodium: 599mg, Potassium: 93mg, Fiber: 1g, Sugar: 7g, Vitamin A: 1IU, Vitamin C: 9mg, Calcium: 16mg, Iron: 0.3mg

Nutrition information is automatically calculated, so should only be used as an approximation.

5 from 10 votes (9 ratings without comment)

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2 Comments

  1. Patrice Anita says:

    5 stars
    I have made this recipe a couple of times now and it is delicious. I am wondering if you think it might work with turnips? Thanks!