How To Make Tomato Confit (Slow-Roasted Tomatoes)

5 from 8 votes
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This tomato confit is prepared by making slow-roasted tomatoes with extra virgin olive oil, garlic, and herbs and then storing them in the oil. The preserved tomatoes are packed with flavor, health benefits, and this recipe is dairy-free, gluten-free, and vegan!

Tomato confit and garlic in a tray with oil

Whether you’ve got a glut of tomatoes you’re looking to preserve or want a delicious new way to enjoy cherry tomatoes – this tomato confit is just what’s needed. I’ve already shared methods for ‘sun-dried’ tomatoes and how to make Tomato Purée/Paste. Now, these slow-roasted tomatoes are cooked with garlic and oil and then stored in jars to use in tons of different ways.

Tomato confit in a jar

While the tomatoes are slow-roasted in the oven, the actual prep time is just minutes. The method consists of super-simple steps and just 4 ingredients (not including salt and pepper).

Once roasted, your preserved tomatoes now have deep roasted flavor and a concentration of herb flavor – they are perfect as a condiment or a side to jazz up tons of meals. Even better, they may even be healthier for you too!

Cherry tomatoes on a wooden chopping board

Did you know that, according to several studies, when tomatoes are eaten alongside healthy fats like olive oil, our bodies can absorb the carotenoid phytochemicals (like Lycopene) in tomatoes between 2-15x more than without? However, there’s one slight caveat – to get the full benefits, the tomatoes have to be cooked – perfect for this tomato confit!

What Is Tomato Confit?

Confit (pronounced con-fee) is a French preservation method traditionally used for building up pantry foods – with a focus on poultry, in particular, that’s slow-cooked in its own fat with some salt.

With this tomato confit, these slow-roasted tomatoes are cooked in olive oil with garlic and herbs and then stored together in sterilized jars. This allows you to enjoy the fresh flavors of the roasted tomatoes for longer.

Tomato confit in a jar

The slow cooking in the fat affects the food in a way that makes it harder for bacteria to grow. Meanwhile, storing the tomatoes in oil helps to reduce oxidization, which leads to further spoilage.

Tomato Confit Vs. Roasted Tomatoes

The biggest difference between the two methods is the amount of oil used. Whereas roasted tomatoes are drizzled with oil, tomato confit bathes in the oil.

Not only does the extra oil help the tomatoes to hold their shape, but it also slows down the process of caramelization – meaning the tomatoes retain more of their fresh flavor.

The Ingredients

Ingredients for tomato confit
  • Tomatoes: make sure to use fresh, ripe tomatoes for the best flavor. I used just red cherry tomatoes, but you can use baby plum tomatoes, or mixed color cherry tomatoes, etc.
  • Extra virgin olive oil: you’re going to need A LOT for this recipe, so don’t cringe. You can use a mild, less expensive cooking olive oil option, but try to use extra virgin olive oil at least to take advantage of the additional health benefits.
  • Herbs: I used thyme. However, you can experiment with others, including oregano, chili flakes, rosemary, etc.
  • Garlic: it infuses the oil with a wonderful additional flavor.
  • Salt & Pepper.

How To Make Tomato Confit

Step 1: Add the items to a deep baking tray or casserole dish. I placed the thyme first, then added the tomatoes and cloves. 

I left the green tops of the tomatoes and the garlic skin. You can remove them in advance if you prefer.

Step 2: Add the olive oil. Add enough so that the tomatoes are all covered at least 1/3 of the way. 

Steps for preparing tomato confit

Step 3: Slow roast tomatoes in the oven for 2-2.5 hours at 195ºF/90ºC(fan-assisted). The tomatoes should begin to burst and blister but without entirely losing their plump shape. 

Before and after roasting tomatoes

Step 4: Allow the tomato confit to cool enough to remove the green tops and garlic skin and then allow them to cool to room temperature before transferring to jar/s. If the tomatoes aren’t completely covered then top them up with a little more olive oil and then store them in the refrigerator (read the FAQs for storage details).

Steps for cleaning roasted tomatoes

How To Serve

I wasn’t kidding when I said there were dozens of ways to enjoy these slow-roasted tomatoes. Here are just a few of my top picks.

And more! Let me know in the comments what your favorite ways of using this cherry tomato confit would be.

Tomato confit in a jar

FAQs

How to store tomato confit?

Store the cherry tomato confit in airtight sterilized jars in the refrigerator, making sure the tomatoes are fully covered with the olive oil. This way, the preserved tomatoes should last several weeks (2-3 at least). Though, to err on the side (because of the garlic in the mixture) of caution, I aim to use it within two weeks.

Can you freeze tomato confit?

Yes, you can. Simply place the freezer-safe containers with the confit tomatoes in the freezer for up to three months. Allow it to thaw in the fridge before using.
Even better, freeze the confit into ice-cube trays and then you can pop out as much as you need and chuck straight into sauces/whatever you’re cooking, to reheat.

What can you do with leftover confit oil?

Don’t worry – there’s no reason to throw it away! There are several ways you can use the leftover tomato confit oil:
– In place of regular cooking oil, to add flavor to dishes.
– Serve with fresh bread and antipasti – as a dipping oil.
– Spooned over dips and sauces.
– To massage kale.
Just make sure to keep the confit tomatoes stored in the refrigerator at all times due to the risk of botulism or freeze it in ice-cube trays (as mentioned above).

Can your water-bath can the tomato confit?

Yes, you can. However, as it is something that I’ve tried yet, I don’t want to share any incorrect information. It’s also important to mention that certain rules exist around the long-term storage of garlic due to botulism concerns.

If you try this slow-roasted tomato confit recipe, then let me know your thoughts and questions in the comments. I’d also really appreciate a recipe rating and would love to see your recreations – just tag @AlphaFoodie.

How To Make Tomato Confit (Slow-Roasted Tomatoes)

5 from 8 votes
By: Samira
This tomato confit is prepared by making slow-roasted tomatoes with extra virgin olive oil, garlic, and herbs then storing them in the oil. The preserved tomatoes are packed with flavor, health benefits, and this recipe is dairy-free, gluten-free, and vegan!
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 2 hours
Total Time: 2 hours 5 minutes
Servings: 8 servings of 1/4 cup each

Ingredients 
 

  • 1 pound tomatoes cherry, baby plum, rainbow cherry, etc.
  • 6 garlic cloves
  • few sprigs thyme or rosemary, oregano, chili flakes, etc.
  • 3/4 cup olive oil extra virgin olive oil is best; mild, not too expensive oil works too
  • 1 tsp salt
  • black pepper optional

These ingredients will yield about 2 cups of tomato confit.

    Instructions 

    • Add the items to a deep baking tray or casserole dish. I placed the thyme first, then added the tomatoes and cloves.
      I left the green tops of the tomatoes and the garlic skin. You can remove them in advance if you prefer.
    • Add the olive oil. Add enough so that the tomatoes are all covered at least 1/3 of the way.
    • Slow roast the tomatoes in the oven for 2-2.5 hours at 195ºF/90ºC(fan-assisted). The tomatoes should begin to burst and blister but without entirely losing their plump shape.
    • Allow the tomato confit to cool enough to remove the green tops and garlic skin and then allow them to cool to room temperature before transferring to jar/s. If the tomatoes aren't completely covered then top them up with a little more olive oil and then store them in the refrigerator or freezer(*read notes)

    Video

    Notes

    How to store tomato confit? Store the tomato confit in airtight sterilized jars in the refrigerator, making sure the tomatoes are fully covered with the olive oil. This way, the preserved tomatoes should last several weeks (2-3 at least). Though, to err on the side of caution (because of the garlic in the mixture), I aim to use it within two weeks.
    Can you freeze tomato confit? Yes, you can. Simply place the freezer-safe containers with the confit in the freezer for up to three months. Allow it to thaw in the fridge before using. Even better, freeze the confit into ice-cube trays and then you can pop out as much as you need and chuck straight into sauces/ whatever you’re cooking- to reheat.
    What can you do with leftover confit oil? Don’t worry – there’s no reason to throw it away! There are several ways you can use the leftover tomato confit oil; In place of regular cooking oil, to add flavor to dishes. Serve with fresh bread and antipasti – as a dipping oil. Spooned over dips and sauces. To massage kale, etc. Just make sure to keep it stored in the refrigerator at all times due to the risk of botulism or freeze it in ice-cube trays.
    Course: Appetizer, Side, Snack
    Cuisine: French
    Freezer friendly: 2-3 Months
    Shelf life: 2 Weeks

    Nutrition

    Serving: 0.25cup, Calories: 193kcal, Carbohydrates: 3g, Protein: 1g, Fat: 20g, Saturated Fat: 3g, Sodium: 294mg, Potassium: 144mg, Fiber: 1g, Sugar: 2g, Vitamin A: 473IU, Vitamin C: 8mg, Calcium: 10mg, Iron: 1mg

    Nutrition information is automatically calculated, so should only be used as an approximation.

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    6 Comments

    1. 5 stars
      I place a salted and lemon-peppered salmon filet skin side down in the smallest dish that will hold it. I empty a cup jar of confit tomatoes around it, and make sure to brush the oil over the top. Roast at 350 degrees for 12-20 minutes (til fish is cooked). Serve over a bed of smashed artichoke hearts. DELICIOUS!

    2. Hi there. I just have a few question:
      – If I freeze the confit, do I keep the tomatoes covered in oil or can I freeze them without the oil?
      – Once defrosted, how long are the tomatoes are good for?
      – How long does just the oil alone keep in the fridge?

      Thanks! Looking forward to making this (and your garlic confit) this weekend! : ).

      1. Hi Susan,
        Yes, it’s best to freeze the tomatoes with the oil, even if they are not completely covered.
        Once defrosted, they should be good for up to a couple of weeks.
        It’s best to use the oil within a couple of weeks.

    3. Is there another way to cook the tomatoes? My oven does not go that low. 250 is the lowest it will go. Thanks

      1. Hi Susan,
        You can cook them at 250F as well for about 1.5-2 hours. The tomatoes should become wrinkly but shouldn’t have burst.