How To Make Rose Extract (Rose Essence)

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A simple DIY for homemade rose extract using organic edible rose petals. This extract is perfect for using within baked goods, puddings, cocktails, other drinks, and even for home and beauty uses. Plus, the process only requires two ‘ingredients’ and a super simple method!

Rose Extract in a glass bottle with fresh roses in the side

Rose flavor within Middle Eastern dishes and desserts is something I’ve grown up enjoying and have carried on loving throughout my time in London, too. While I’ve already shared a post on how to make rose water flavor, now it’s time to make a more concentrated (but just as simple) rose extract.

This process takes a little bit of forethought as it requires a few days of ‘steeping,’ but other than that, the actual hands-on time is practically still in the single digits. The result is a deep pink/red liquid that works well for culinary uses, as well as beauty and home purposes.

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Rose water vs. Rose essence/extract

I already have a post for how to make rose water, so I thought I’d let you know precisely what the difference is between the two (technically three), as it can cause some confusion.

Rose water and rose extract are similar (but different) rose flavorings – as well as being used for beauty, and ‘home’ uses too.

Rose extract is a much more concentrated form of the two, and is made in a similar way to vanilla extract. By infusing rose petals in vodka over a long period of time to extract all the flavor.

Spread of fresh roses on a tray

Meanwhile, rose water uses a kind of ‘steam distillation’ method for a more delicate result.

When using either for culinary purposes, usually, they are used in a 1:5 ratio. I.e., every 1ml rose extract is equal to 5ml rose water.

Meanwhile, the word ‘essence’ is often used synonymously with ‘flavoring’ and sometimes even ‘extract’ and, from what I’ve personally found, can often contain a lot more synthetic/artificial ingredients. Although, not always the case – which is why I consider this a DIY for rose essence/ rose extract in one.

The Method

The method for this rose extract is super simple and only requires two ingredients:

  • Organic, edible rose petals – Make sure to get an edible variety, if using for culinary purposes.
  • High Strength Vodka – see the note below.

Note* If you don’t plan on using the extract for edible purposes, then you could also use Isopropyl alcohol (which is not safe for human consumption). This works well as a body and home ‘mist’ and for various other beauty and home uses.

Ingredients for making rose extract

Step By Step Instructions

Step 1: Wash the rose petals carefully to get off any critters/ dirt. Then dry well.

Step 2: Place the petals in a large sterilized glass jar and then pour the vodka overthe petals, making sure to completely cover them in the liquid. Then close the jar and store in a dark, cool location, such as a cupboard, for 2-3 days.

Steps for making rose extract

During this time, the flavor, smell, and even color will leech from the petals into the vodka.

Step 3: Sieve the rose vodka mixture to remove the petals and then decant it into sterilized glass jars or even dropper bottles.

Collage of the Final Steps for making rose extract

How To Store

Just like vanilla extract, this pure rose extract can be stored at room temperature, in a dark cupboard.

I’m not sure exactly how long it will last, as I always run out before reaching that point. Though, due to the alcohol, the shelf life should be several months at-least.

How To Use

The key to using rose extract, especially when you’re new to the flavor, is use it sparingly! A little goes a long way. Luckily, there are tons of ways to use this ingredient.

Because of the strength of the extract, I love using it in baked goods, as it holds up well to the flavors but mellows slightly. Cookies, macarons, brownies, cakes, etc.

However, it’s also a favorite for Middle Eastern desserts such as baklava, halva, Turkish delight, and other creamy puddings too. I love mine in rice puddings.

You can also use it to:

For non-culinary uses, it can be used as a house, linen, and body mist too. Plus, read my rosewater post for more benefits and uses. For example, the extract may help with headaches and digestive issues when drank with water.

You could also simply put it in a spray bottle, and spritz it around the house, on your linens, in the car, etc.

Two bottles of Rose Extract with fresh roses in the side

DIY Notes and FAQs

  • Depending on the color and aroma of your rose petals, will affect the color and aroma of the final extract.
  • For an even more fragrant result, you can double steep the mixture. When removing the petals after 2-3 days, pop in an additional handful or two of petals and allow to steep a second time before the final sieve and decanting.
  • REMEMBER – I’ve mentioned this above but since it’s crucial – always use edible roses and either a clear vodka or rum (at least 70 proof), when wanting to use for culinary purposes. Though, if you’re just using for home and beauty then you can use any roses and isopropyl alcohol.
  • For an alcohol-free version, you could try to make this extract with glycerine. I haven’t tried to do so with this DIY before, however, I’ve had great results when using it for vanilla extract.
  • I haven’t tried to use dried rose petals for this purpose, so I’m not sure how much the results would be affected.

Other Rose Recipes

Homemade Rose Water
Homemade Rose Petal Jam

If you give this rose water extract DIY a try, then let me know your thoughts and any questions in the comments. Also, feel free to tag me in your recreations @AlphaFoodie.

How To Make Rose Extract

5 from 5 votes
By: Samira
A simple DIY for homemade rose extract using organic edible rose petals. This extract is perfect for using within baked goods, puddings, cocktails, other drinks, and even for home and beauty uses. Plus, the process only requires two 'ingredients' and a super simple method!
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 2 days 10 minutes
Servings: 96 servings

Ingredients 
 

  • 3 cups Organic Edible Rose Petals
  • 2 cups vodka or rum (70 Proof- 35%)

Instructions 

  • Wash the rose petals carefully to get off any critters and dirt. Then dry well.
  • Place the petals in a large sterilized glass jar and then pour the vodka over the petals, making sure to completely cover them in the liquid. Then close the jar and store in a dark, cool location, such as a cupboard, for 2-3 days.
    During this time, the flavor, smell, and even color will leech from the petals into the vodka.
  • Sieve the rose vodka mixture to remove the petals and then decant it into sterilized glass jars or even dropper bottles.

How To Store

  • Just like vanilla extract, this pure rose extract can be stored at room temperature, in a dark cupboard.
    I'm not sure exactly how long it will last, as I always run out before reaching that point. Though, due to the alcohol, the shelf life should be several months at-least.

Notes

  • Depending on the color and aroma of your rose petals, will affect the color and aroma of the final extract.
  • For an even more fragrant result, you can double steep the mixture. When removing the petals after 2-3 days, pop in an additional handful or two of petals and allow to steep a second time before the final sieve and decanting.
  • REMEMBER – I’ve mentioned this above but since it’s crucial – always use edible roses and either a clear vodka or rum (at least 70 proof), when wanting to use for culinary purposes. Though, if you’re just using for home and beauty then you can use any roses and isopropyl alcohol.
  • For an alcohol-free version, you could try to make this extract with glycerine. I haven’t tried to do so with this DIY before, however, I’ve had great results when using it for vanilla extract.
  • I haven’t tried to use dried rose petals for this purpose, so I’m not sure how much the results would be affected.

Read the blog post for suggested uses. You can also check out my Rosewater DIY for more information on the benefits of rosewater  (many of which will be the same for this extract) and additional uses. 
Course: DIYs
Cuisine: Middle Eastern
Shelf life: 6 Months

Nutrition

Serving: 1tsp, Calories: 14kcal, Carbohydrates: 1g, Protein: 1g, Fat: 1g, Saturated Fat: 1g, Sodium: 1mg, Potassium: 1mg, Fiber: 1g, Sugar: 1g, Vitamin A: 22IU, Vitamin C: 1mg, Iron: 1mg

Nutrition information is automatically calculated, so should only be used as an approximation.

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7 Comments

  1. Anuroop says:

    Please tell me what preparation add for long lasting &if possible please tell me formula of Rosewater

  2. Miranda says:

    Hello- I plan to wait until rouse are in season before making the extract. However, I wanted to ask if you have suggestions as to where I might obtain organic edible roses? I have looked online, only finding dried. I have looked locally (Florida) and sad to say, no luck.

    I also wanted to know what size swing-top bottle are you displaying the finish product in, are they 4oz or 8oz?

    Thank you,
    M-

    1. Support @ Alphafoodie says:

      Hi Miranda,
      Maybe check with some local florists to see if they can order the roses for you?
      The swing-top bottles were 8 oz. You can use a bigger bottle if preferred. I hope this helps.

  3. Şebnem says:

    Hello from Turkey ! Can we make mint extract with the same method?

    1. Support @ Alphafoodie says:

      Hello,
      Yes, this method will work for mint extract too. You’d need to keep the jar in a dark cool place for 1-2 months before the mint extract is ready.

  4. brinacyl says:

    hi there! when using glycerin, how long should I let rose petals steep in glycerin? also can you please recommend a supplier for edible rose in the UK (London)? many thanks