How To Make Avocado Oil (Extra Virgin – Cold Process)

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How to make avocado oil – extracted from ripe/overripe avocados with a simple, cold process and perfect for cooking, frying, hair, and beauty uses!

Avocado sliced in two and a small bottle with homemade avocado oil

If virgin or extra virgin coconut oil isn’t for you, perhaps this homemade avocado oil is more up your alley. Using just a few ripe (or overripe) avocados and a bit of patience, you’ll have some ‘green gold’ oil for all your cooking, beauty, and/or DIY needs. It’s a perfect way to use up the overripe avocados we all find ourselves with too!

I know that when I shared my coconut oil DIY with you, I got several messages/comments asking why to bother when it’s so easily bought in the shops. Well, that’s the case with most DIY’s really -, but it certainly hasn’t put me off before.

Making your own pantry staples is not only fun, but it’s a great way to ensure that your products have no unwanted and unnecessary additives, preservatives, and chemicals. More so, you can avoid unnecessary extra processing and, very often, save on money too! Plus, with avocado oil – you can reduce waste too – by using all those surprise overripe avocados for the job!

Avocados

Okay, I’ll admit that avocado oil is not exactly the most cost-effective of my many DIY’s unless you have a source of free/ low-cost avocados (or can slowly gather overripe avocados to stop them from going to waste (see notes*)). However, it’s certainly fun and worth sharing! Plus, there’s something extremely satisfying about seeing your avocados turn to an (admittedly yucky) brown paste before unexpectedly squeezing out a bounty of healthy, wonderful avocado oil.

This extra virgin avocado oil is also great for those who want to consume unrefined oils without the use of heat. While this process isn’t exactly cold-pressed ( I don’t have the equipment for that), this is the next best thing and a method ANYONE can do at home!

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Avocado Oil Benefits

Half an avocado and a small bottle with avocado oil

In general, avocados are known for their bountiful health benefits, including benefits from its healthy fat. Likewise, avocado oil is also packed with healthy fats and antioxidants. Here are just a few of some of the health benefits of avocado oil.

  • The oil is rich in Oleic Acid, a super healthy fat – In fact, 70% of avocado oil is made up of it. Oleic acid is a monounsaturated omega-9 fatty acid and wonderful for heart health and possibly even beneficial towards boosting memory.
  • Increases ‘good’ HDL cholesterol levels while reducing ‘bad’ LDL cholesterol and blood pressure, thus great for heart health.
  • Packed with antioxidants – which help to fight oxidization in the body and damage caused by free radicals. This, in turn, reduces the risk of several chronic diseases (i.e., heart disease, diabetes, and other inflammatory-based conditions). Avocados are also a good source a Lutein, an antioxidant great for eye health!
  • Beneficial for skin – due to the fatty acids, avocado oil may be used to enhance wound healing, moisturize skin, and it has anti-inflammatory properties to relieve conditions such as psoriasis and eczema. The same can be said for its use on the scalp – reducing any dry, flaky skin.
  • Can help enhance nutrient absorption – Several nutrients need to be combined with a fat to be absorbed. Avocado oil is a great example of a fat that will help to increase the absorption rate substantially.

The Step-By-Step Instructions

Step 1: Prepare an avocado paste

First, mash the avocados into a smooth paste. You can use a hand masher or blender/food processor for this.

I used a hand masher this time round to see the results. A smoother paste from a machine can yield slightly better results due to the more even drying.

Steps for mashing avocados

Once mashed, spread the avocado paste in a thin layer over a parchment paper-lined tray or similar surface. Aim to keep the layer below 1/2-inch thickness. Use multiple trays, if necessary.

Step 2: Dry the paste

Allow the avocado paste to dry naturally in a well-ventilated area (away from direct sunshine) for a few days.

You may also use a dehydrator to speed up this process. Though, keep the temperature below 40ºC/104ºF for the oil to remain extra virgin.

The amount of time this takes may differ depending on the climate/weather where you live.

Drying out avocados

Once you notice that the top of your avocado paste has gone considerably brown, then mix it up well and re-spread into a thin layer. You’ll need to do this several times (at least 2 times a day – usually morning and evening).

Continue to do this until you have a very dark brown colored paste. If yours was slightly chunky, like mine, then you may still have a few green bits. If it was super smooth, it’s likely that the entire paste is now brown.

Some people wait until the paste is almost completely dried, but if you do so, then you’ll find it incredibly difficult to extract the oil. One good way to know that it is ready is to look at your spoon when mixing the paste; the first few times you mix the mixture, it will pick up avocado. However, when it’s ready, you’ll notice that the paste no longer sticks to the spoon. Instead, it will look slightly oily.

Step 3: Extract the avocado oil

Place the avocado paste in a nut milk bag, muslin cloth, or similar material.

Adding mashed avocados in a nut milk bag

You can now either hand-squeeze the oil into a container or leave it to naturally drain, squeezing it at the end of the draining process to get the last of the oil.

Draining avocado oil in a jar

If, for whatever reason, there are any ‘bits’ in the oil, then feel free to strain it once more when decanting it into a sterilized glass container.

Check the notes section at the bottom of the post for ways on how to use the leftover avocado pulp, seeds, and skin!

Homemade Avocado oil in a spoon laying over mashed avocados

How To Store

Avocado oil is shelf stable and should last for months (possibly even up to a year) when stores in an airtight container away from direct heat and sunlight.

You can also keep the oil stored in the fridge to extend the shelf life further, by a few months even.

Homemade avocado oil in small bottle

Avocado Oil Uses

You can use this oil in many of the same ways that you would extra virgin olive oil. Though, luckily for avocados, this oil has a higher smoke point (around 250C/480F) than many oils and yet still has a fairly neutral flavor (especially when heated). 

When using it for beauty purposes, there are several different methods. This includes as a moisturizer, facial moisturizer, face mask, skin cream, scalp oil, hair mask, bath oil, etc.

How To Use The Leftover Avocado

Mashed avocado in ice cube tray
  • Leftover avocado pulp: You can use this pulp to be brownies, or as a spread similar to olive spread. The leftover avocado pulp for hair and face masks. It can also be composted or dried into a powder and added to increase nutrients within dishes. If you don’t want to use it all immediately, then freeze the paste into ice-cube trays and thaw when needed.
  • Leftover avocado seeds: You can use the skins and pits together to create a natural pink-hued dye, dry and grate/grind it into a powder to add to smoothies and dishes (or use as an exfoliant), make into a highly nutritious tea, or even use the pit to help grow a new avocado plant.
  • Leftover Avocado Peels: As previously mentioned, these can be used to make a pink dye. The skin can also be used to extract oil if you have a presser (like an orange presser!). You can also freeze the skins and then use them as an interesting way to plate up food (like this Simple 4-Ingredient Pistachio Avocado Ice Cream) or even to plant seedlings.

Let me know in the comments if there are ways that I haven’t mentioned above, to use all the leftover avocado parts!

One avocado and a small jug with avocado oil

DIY notes

  • Avocado oil can differ in shade and yield based on what avocados you use and several factors. The color can range from a golden yellow-green to dark green.
  • To make organic avocado oil, simply use organic avocados.
  • Tip for cheap avocados: If you’re purchasing avocados from a farmer’s market, it can be a good idea to look out for overripe avocados. You’ll often get them cheaper (or can haggle to get them cheaper).
  • You can also use any overripe avocados that you have at home ( it happens to all of us). If you want to wait until you have a good amount before making the oil, then freeze the overripe avocados until you have enough. Thaw them on the counter before using.
  • If you plan on using avocado oil to help treat any skin condition, it may be best to consult your doctor first and/or do a skin patch test to check for potential allergies.

Related DIYs

If you try this DIY for how to make avocado oil, then let me know your thoughts and questions in the comments. I’d also really appreciate a recipe rating and would love to see your recreations – just tag @AlphaFoodie.

How To Make Avocado Oil (Extra Virgin – Cold-process)

4.88 from 16 votes
By: Samira
How to make avocado oil at home with just some ripe or overripe avocados and a bit of patience! perfect for high-heat baking, frying, and cooking as well as for hair and beauty purposes!
Servings: 10 Tablespoons

Ingredients  

  • 10 avocados, medium

This many medium avocados yields about 2/3 cups of avocado oil.

Instructions 

Step 1: Prepare an avocado paste

  • First, mash the avocados into a smooth paste. You can use a hand masher, fork, or blender/food processor for this*.
  • Once mashed, spread the avocado paste in a thin layer over a parchment paper-lined tray or similar surface. Aim to keep the layer below 1/2-inch thickness. Use multiple trays, if necessary.

Step 2: Dry the paste

  • Allow the avocado paste to dry naturally** in a well-ventilated area (away from direct sunshine) for a few days (4-5). The amount of time this takes may differ depending on the climate/weather where you live.
    Once you notice that the top of your avocado paste has gone considerably brown, then mix it up well and re-spread into a thin layer. You'll need to do this several times (at least 2 times a day – usually morning and evening).
  • Continue to do this until you have a very dark brown colored paste. If yours was slightly chunky, like mine, then you may still have a few green bits. If it was super smooth, it's likely that the entire paste is now brown.***

Step 3: Extract the avocado oil

  • Place the avocado paste in a nut milk bag, muslin cloth, or similar material. You can now either hand-squeeze the oil into a container or leave it to naturally drain, squeezing it at the end of the draining process to get the last of the oil.
    If, for whatever reason, there are any 'bits' in the oil, then feel free to strain it once more when decanting it into a sterilized glass container.

How To Store

  • Avocado oil is shelf-stable and should last for months (possibly even up to a year) when stores in an airtight container away from direct heat and sunlight.
    You can also keep the oil stored in the fridge to extend the shelf life further, by a few months even.

Notes

* I used a hand masher this time round to see the results. A smoother paste from a machine can yield slightly better results due to the more even drying.
** You may also use a dehydrator to speed up this process. Though, keep the temperature below 40ºC/104ºF for the oil to remain extra virgin.
*** Some people wait until the paste is almost completely dried, but if you do so, then you’ll find it incredibly difficult to extract the oil. One good way to know that it is ready is to look at your spoon when mixing the paste; the first few times you mix the mixture, it will pick up avocado. However, when it’s ready, you’ll notice that the paste no longer sticks to the spoon. Instead, it will look slightly oily.

Other DIY notes
  • Avocado oil can differ in shade and yield based on what avocados you use and several factors (the color can range from a golden yellowy green to dark green- green is best!).
  • To make organic avocado oil, simply use organic avocados.
  • Tip for cheap avocados: If you’re purchasing avocados from a farmers market, it can be a good idea to look out for overripe avocados as you’ll often get them cheaper (or can haggle to get them cheaper).
  • You can also use any overripe avocados that you have at home ( it happens to all of us). If you want to wait until you have a good amount before making the oil, then freeze the overripe avocados until you have enough, thawing them on the counter till they reach room temperature. 
  • If you plan on using avocado oil to help treat any skin condition, it may be best to consult your doctor first and/or do a skin patch test to check for potential allergies.

Read the blog post above for ways to use the leftover avocado flesh, seeds (pits), and skin!
Course: Condiment, DIYs
Freezer friendly: Yes
Shelf life: 6 Months (airtight container)
4.88 from 16 votes (8 ratings without comment)

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Recipe Rating




44 Comments

  1. Kareemat says:

    5 stars
    Excellent and stress-free way to make avocado oil

    1. Support @ Alphafoodie says:

      Thank you for your comment, Kareemat.

  2. Joshua says:

    now I have tried but they turned into moulds,

    1. Support @ Alphafoodie says:

      Hi Joshua,
      Did you keep turning the avocado paste so it would dry evenly? It’s normal for it to turn dark in color. Is yours dark or actually moldy?

  3. Karis says:

    4 stars
    Wow!!, that’s incredible I guess now I won’t bother myself looking for how to extract avocado oil, not when you’re with us here, thanks alot

    1. Support @ Alphafoodie says:

      Thank you for your comment, Karis. Glad I could help! 🙂

    2. Luisa says:

      5 stars
      Great recipe

      1. Support @ Alphafoodie says:

        Thank you so much for your comment, Luisa!

  4. carol says:

    5 stars
    Excelente post, he estado mirando muchos videos caseros de como hacer aceite d aguacate y definitivamente este es el mejor, muchas gracias el tiempo que dedicaste a realizar esta publicación tan explicativa, gracias nuevamente…

    1. Support @ Alphafoodie says:

      Thank you so much, Carol! <3

  5. Soleil says:

    Hi, I tried this process and when I went to squeeze out the oil there was barely anything coming out.
    Did I let it dry too long?
    I used around 20 avocados so I was expecting quite a bit of oil. I only got a few drops after squeezing for 20 minutes.

    1. Support @ Alphafoodie says:

      Hi Soleil,
      For how long did you let it dry?
      Instead of squeezing it (which I admit is very laborious), you could let it drain for a few hours.