Fresh Ginger Simple Syrup Recipe

5 from 12 votes
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This 3-ingredient fresh ginger syrup is zingy, robust, and perfect for adding to cocktails, lemonade, desserts, and more! Honey ginger syrup and sugar-free options are included.

Hand holding a bottle of homemade ginger syrup

What Is Ginger Syrup

Simple syrups are a must-have in my kitchen. Whether it’s to make lemonade, sweeten coffee, add to dessert, etc., I love to have several syrups on hand at all times. At the moment, that includes coffee syrup, lemon syrup, and this ginger simple syrup (which can be made with regular sugar, honey, or even sugar-free!).

Thanks to its robust flavor, ginger is easy to infuse into a simple syrup (a combination of just sugar and water) to pack a flavor punch. The resulting ginger-infused simple syrup is the perfect addition to several cocktails, ginger ale or ginger beer, and lemonade, along with several other culinary uses (listed below).

A bottle of homemade ginger syrup with ginger pulp and ginger root next to it

Even better, this recipe is highly versatile, with plenty of options to add to and enhance the spicy, zingy, tangy flavor of the stem ginger in syrup. This includes chili (for spicy ginger syrup), mint, citrus, vanilla, and more. And all in just a few simple steps (dissolve the sugar in water, leave the ginger to infuse, strain, and enjoy)!

Looking for more ways to enjoy ginger? Check out my homemade ginger marmalade, freshly squeezed orange ginger juice, ginger salad dressing, or browse this list of 40+ ginger recipes!

What Is Ginger Syrup Made Of

  • Fresh ginger root: I recommend using fresh, young organic ginger for the best results. However, you can also use frozen ginger (thawed first) or homemade ginger paste (with no oil/salt added).
  • Sugar: Use your sugar of choice. White granulated sugar, cane, coconut, brown sugar, etc. Just note that the sugar you use will affect the color of the homemade ginger syrup recipe.

You can also use sugar-free sweeteners like granulated erythritol or stevia. However, these syrups will have a thinner consistency.

  • Water: Use tap or filter water.
Ingredients for ginger syrup

How to Make Ginger Syrup

There are a few simple steps for how to make ginger simple syrup.

First, peel and grate (or mince) the ginger.

When using organic ginger, I often keep the peel on, though the ginger-infused syrup will be slightly darker. You could also use ginger slices, but the flavor takes longer to infuse the ginger flavor.

Then add the ginger, sugar and water to a small saucepan and heat over medium-high heat. Stir well until the sugar dissolves.

Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to low-medium, and simmer for 20 minutes to allow the ginger to infuse. And that’s how long to boil ginger syrup.

Steps for making ginger syrup

How Long Does It Take for Simple Syrup to Thicken

Classic simple syrup dissolves sugar in water and isn’t very thick. However, the longer you simmer the mixture, the thicker the syrup becomes. Likewise, a rich syrup (with a higher sugar-to-water ratio) is naturally thicker, too.

Once your ginger simple syrup has reached the desired thickness (it thickens more as it cools), remove from the heat. Allow it to steep with a lid on until it reaches your desired taste (check every 10 minutes).

Finally, strain it through a fine-mesh strainer to remove the ginger pulp, and pour it into a clean, airtight bottle or jar. Let it cool to room temperature.

Sieving ginger syrup to remove the pulp

How Long Does Ginger Simple Syrup Last

Store the ginger simple syrup in the refrigerator for 2-3 weeks, giving it a shake before each use. Note that any add-ins may affect the shelf life. Look out for signs of cloudiness and mold to see if the homemade ginger syrup has spoiled.

Can You Freeze Ginger Syrup?

Due to the high sugar content, simple syrups don’t freeze solid. However, you can still extend the shelf life of this ginger infused simple syrup in the freezer, storing it for 8-10 months.

You can add the cubes to iced tea, lemonade, club soda, etc., straight from the freezer or allow it to thaw at room temperature first

A bottle with homemade ginger simple syrup

How to Use Ginger Syrup

If you love the taste of ginger, there are practically endless ginger syrup uses, including:

  • It’s the perfect ginger cocktail syrup (ginger mojito, margarita, Moscow mule, etc.). It can be used as a ginger concentrate for ginger syrup cocktails.
  • Use it to make lemonade, soda water (with fresh lime juice), homemade ginger ale, or kombucha.
  • Spoon into hot chocolate, tea, or coffee drinks.
  • Use ginger sugar syrup to flavor frosting and icing.
  • Brush over cake layers to keep them moist.
  • Drizzle over gingerbread, chai, or other “spiced” cupcakes and muffins.
  • Drizzle over waffles, french toast, and pancakes.
  • Drizzle over yogurt bowls with fruit.
  • Enjoy with oatmeal and overnight oats.
  • Drizzle over ice cream.
  • Use as part of a marinade of glaze for proteins.
Homemade ginger syrup and ginger root

FAQs

Do you have to peel the ginger for homemade ginger syrup recipe?

No, it’s up to you. I often leave the peel if the ginger is organic. The flavor is the same, though the color is slightly darker.

How to make ginger rich syrup?

Use a 2:1 ratio of sugar to water. This creates a richer, thicker syrup with an extended shelf life (1-2 months in the fridge).

How to use the leftover ginger pulp?

You can add this sweetened pulp to smoothies, use it to make ginger tea, toss it in sugar, and dehydrate/dry it to make candied ginger. Or you can even blend and spread it across a parchment-lined tray, then dehydrate it to make ginger pulp crackers.

More Simple Syrup Recipes

If you try this simple ginger syrup recipe, I’d love to hear your thoughts and questions below. Also, I’d really appreciate a recipe card rating below, and tag me in your recipe recreations on Instagram @Alphafoodie!

Fresh Ginger Simple Syrup Recipe

5 from 12 votes
By: Samira
This 3-ingredient fresh ginger syrup is zingy, robust, and perfect for adding to cocktails, lemonade, desserts, and more! Honey ginger syrup and sugar-free options are included.
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 25 minutes
Servings: 16 Tablespoons

Ingredients 
 

  • 3.2 oz fresh ginger 1 cup grated
  • 6.4 oz sugar 1 cup; white, cane, coconut, brown, etc.; or a sugar alternative like erythritol
  • 1 cup water

This amount will yield about 1 cup of ginger syrup

    Instructions 

    • Peel and grate (or mince) the ginger.
      When using organic ginger, I often keep the peel on, though the ginger-infused syrup will be slightly darker. You could also use ginger slices, but the flavor takes longer to infuse.
    • Add all the ingredients to a saucepan and heat over medium, stirring well until the sugar dissolves.
    • Bring the mixture to a boil, reduce the heat to low-medium, and simmer for 20 minutes to allow the ginger to infuse.
    • Once your ginger simple syrup has reached the desired thickness (it thickens more as it cools), remove it from the heat and allow it to steep with a lid on until it reaches your desired taste (check every 10 minutes).
    • Strain it through a fine-mesh sieve to remove the ginger pulp, and pour it into a clean, airtight bottle or jar.

    Storage Instructions

    • Store the ginger simple syrup in the refrigerator for 2-3 weeks, giving it a shake before each use. Note that any add-ins may affect the shelf life. Look out for signs of cloudiness and mold to see if the homemade ginger syrup has spoiled.
      Can You Freeze Ginger Syrup?
      Due to the high sugar content, simple syrups don’t freeze solid. However, you can still extend the shelf life of this ginger simple syrup in the freezer, storing it for 8-10 months. 

    Notes

    • To sterilize your jar: Wash the jars/bottles in hot soapy water, rinsing well. Then place the jars (no rubber or plastic parts) in a preheated oven for ten minutes at 160ºC/325ºF to dry fully (any moisture can cause spoilage sooner). Alternatively, you can boil the jars for 10 minutes.
    • Tweak the ratios: Add more or less ginger, depending on how robust you want the flavor.
    • For a more robust flavor: Blend the syrup with the ginger pulp after it cools, then strain it through a nut milk bag.
    Optional add-ins and variations:
    • Honey ginger syrup: Substitute the sugar for honey (or maple syrup). You can also experiment with the ratio of honey to water if preferred (I never use more than 1:1).
    • Vanilla: Use 1-2 vanilla pods, seeds scraped out, then remove the empty pods before storing the syrup.
    • Gingerbread syrup: Add a pre-blended “gingerbread” spice blend. I also like to add light molasses (2-3 Tbsp) for a richer gingerbread flavor.
    • Other spices: i.e., cinnamon, allspice, nutmeg, clove, cardamom, etc., added to taste.
    • Ginger-mint syrup: Add around ½ cup of lightly packed fresh mint leaves to the ginger syrup recipe.
    • Lemon-ginger syrup: Add a ⅓-½ cup of fresh lemon juice for a bright and zesty syrup. You could add some lemon zest, too.
    • Chili-ginger: Swap out the chili used based on how spicy you want it to be. I use one small bird’s eye chili, sliced, and remove it before decanting the spicy ginger syrup. You can optionally toast the chili first for a slightly smoky flavor in the ginger concentrate.
    • Ginger coconut syrup: Swap out the water for coconut water for ginger-infused simple syrup with added complexity and a slightly nutty flavor.
    Check the blog post for more tips, serving recommendations, and answers to top FAQs!
    Course: Condiment, DIYs
    Cuisine: American, Asian, Global
    Freezer friendly: 6-8 Months
    Shelf life: 2 Weeks (in fridge)

    Nutrition

    Serving: 1Tbsp, Calories: 48kcal, Carbohydrates: 12g, Protein: 0.1g, Fat: 0.1g, Saturated Fat: 0.01g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.01g, Monounsaturated Fat: 0.01g, Sodium: 2mg, Potassium: 24mg, Fiber: 0.1g, Sugar: 11g, Vitamin C: 0.3mg, Calcium: 1mg, Iron: 0.04mg

    Nutrition information is automatically calculated, so should only be used as an approximation.

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    Recipe Rating




    6 Comments

    1. 5 stars
      This is so easy to make, and since I only drink ginger tea because I have food restrictions, this is great for me! I will enjoy looking at more ginger recipes.

    2. Thanks for this fabulous recipe! So many great tips and creative ideas! Just a little edit needed here…

      ”You can simply slice the ginger into coins, but I like how the grated/minced GARLIC infuses the syrup better.”

      1. Thank you so much for spotting this, Darma! It’s fixed now. I hope you enjoy this *ginger* recipe 🙂

      1. Hi Iris,
        You can use the crackers as a snack, a part of graze board or cheese board, or instead of croutons for soup. I hope this helps.